CP Law Associates

Landlords - EPC Rating

Do Landlords have to monitor their EPC rating?

Under UK law, landlords must have a valid EPC for their rental property and must provide a copy of the certificate to tenants before they move in. The EPC provides information about the energy efficiency of the property, including recommendations for improving its energy performance.

Landlords must also ensure that the EPC rating of their rental property meets the minimum energy efficiency standards (MEES) set by the government. Since 1 April 2020, rental properties in England and Wales must have a minimum EPC rating of E or above. Landlords with properties rated F or G must take steps to improve the energy efficiency of the property, such as installing insulation or upgrading heating systems, to bring the property up to at least an E rating.

Landlords must monitor their EPC rating to ensure that it remains compliant with the MEES regulations. If a landlord fails to comply with these regulations, they may face financial penalties and may be unable to rent out their property until the necessary improvements have been made.

What happens if a landlord does not manage their EPC rating?

If a landlord does not monitor their Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) rating and fails to ensure that their rental property meets the minimum energy efficiency standards (MEES), they may be subject to financial penalties and other consequences.

Since 1 April 2018, landlords who fail to comply with the MEES regulations may face a financial penalty of up to £5,000 per property. The amount of the penalty will depend on the length of time the property has been in breach of the regulations and the property’s rateable value.

In addition to financial penalties, landlords who do not comply with the MEES regulations may also face other consequences, such as:

  1. Inability to rent out the property: Landlords who fail to comply with the MEES regulations may be unable to rent out their property until the necessary improvements have been made.

  2. Negative impact on property value: A low EPC rating can negatively affect the value of a property, as potential buyers or renters may be put off by high energy bills and a property that is not energy-efficient.

  3. Negative publicity: Landlords who do not comply with the MEES regulations may face negative publicity and damage to their reputation, which can affect their ability to attract tenants in the future.

Therefore, it is important for landlords to monitor their EPC rating and ensure that their rental properties meet the minimum energy efficiency standards to avoid potential penalties and other consequences.

What can you do if your landlord is not monitoring their EPC rating?

If your landlord is not monitoring the Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) rating for your rental property and you believe that the property does not meet the minimum energy efficiency standards (MEES), there are several steps you can take:

  1. Contact your landlord: The first step is to contact your landlord and raise your concerns about the property’s EPC rating. Your landlord may not be aware of the issue, and it is possible that they will take steps to improve the energy efficiency of the property.

  2. Request a copy of the EPC: You have the right to request a copy of the EPC for your rental property. This will give you information about the property’s energy efficiency rating and any recommendations for improving its energy performance.

  3. Report the issue to the local authority: If your landlord does not take action to improve the energy efficiency of the property, you can report the issue to the local authority. The local authority has the power to issue fines and other penalties to landlords who do not comply with the MEES regulations.

  4. Seek legal advice: If you have taken these steps and your landlord still does not comply with the MEES regulations, you may wish to seek legal advice. A solicitor or housing law specialist can advise you on your legal rights and options for taking further action.

It is important to note that you have legal rights as a tenant, and your landlord has legal obligations to ensure that your rental property meets certain standards, including the minimum energy efficiency standards.

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